Pictures from LA Pride 2014, June 8, 2014.

Pictures by Christina House and Barbara Davidson, Los Angeles Times; by dvsross on Flickr via LGBTQ Nation. All rights reserved to respective owners. No copyright infringement intended.

4 months ago · 234 notes · Source

Pictures from Belgian Pride 2014, Brussels, Belgium.

Photos by Stanislav Dobák, Johan LeysJef Van Den Houte and Belgian Pride and all rights reserved to respective owners. No copyright infringement intended.

4 months ago · 181 notes · Source

June is PRIDE month!
from wikipedia:

The month of June was chosen for LGBT Pride Month to commemorate the Stonewall riots, which occurred at the end of June 1969. As a result, many pride events are held during this month to recognize the impact LGBT people have had in the world.Brenda Howard is known as the "Mother of Pride", for her work in coordinating the first LGBT Pride march, and she also originated the idea for a week-long series of events around Pride Day which became the genesis of the annual LGBT Pride celebrations that are now held around the world every June.

Original picture on the image background was taken during DC Parade, June 9, 2012 by bossi on flickr.

June is PRIDE month!

from wikipedia:

The month of June was chosen for LGBT Pride Month to commemorate the Stonewall riots, which occurred at the end of June 1969. As a result, many pride events are held during this month to recognize the impact LGBT people have had in the world.Brenda Howard is known as the "Mother of Pride", for her work in coordinating the first LGBT Pride march, and she also originated the idea for a week-long series of events around Pride Day which became the genesis of the annual LGBT Pride celebrations that are now held around the world every June.

Original picture on the image background was taken during DC Parade, June 9, 2012 by bossi on flickr.

4 months ago · 715 notes · Reblogged from comingoutjournal

ILGA Europe - Rainbow Europe Map, May 2014

Rainbow Europe Map reflecting the 49 European countries’ legislation and policies that have a direct impact on the enjoyment of human rights by LGBTI people. The Rainbow Map reflects each country’s situation and provides overall score on how far this country is on a scale between 0% and 100%.

ILGA Europe has also released their annual review of the human rights situation of LGBTQ* people in Europe, which you can find here: Click for PDF

On top of the list, UK has 88% followed by Belgium with 78%, while Russia remains at bottom with 6%, 1% down from last year’s report.

Malta has the highest improvement over last year, increasing its score from 35% to 57%, by 22%. 

You can find overview and ranking differences of countries here.
For more about the scoring, click here.


5 months ago · 78 notes · Source

Anonymous asked: “Heyy!! So, I'm gay and I'm having a really hard time with accepting myself. I kind of hate myself for it. I know that there's nothing wrong with being gay and even though I know that my friends would be supportive I can't bring myself to talk to them about it. I don't know why and I'm feeling really trapped and lonely. Do you have any tips on how I could learn to accept such a huge part of me? Thanks!! :)”

Hello anon,

I do know that feeling, as I had gone through the same in past. It is normal to be unable to talk about it with your friends where you are already feeling that way, but think about how encouraging it would be for yourself as well.

Let’s think in a different way about the whole acceptance deal. Acceptance is kind of a weird word for this purpose, I believe, as it feels like as if being gay is something bad, but we are still “accepting” it, agreeing to go with it although we are not fond of it or liking it, so instead EMBRACE yourself. The interesting thing about the deal is that, I believe it is not ourselves thinking being gay is wrong but rather what we have mostly taught about it, at least that was the case for me. I mean, we do not look to our eyes and say “oh, well, my eyes are hazel, shucks, but I will accept it” or if we are to have a more emotional approach, we do not say “I am a friendly person, it sucks but I will try to accept it but I hate myself for being friendly”, but why this becomes possible when the word is gay? So embrace it, do not just accept it. It is not completely who you are but rather a part of yours, one of the million things that can be used to tell about who you are, but not only it. Why would you hate yourself for being attracted to that instead of this? Why would you hate yourself for falling in love? Would you? You should not, as love is a huge part of us, and an amazing magnificent thing that is to live, so there is nothing to hate about it. Love yourself, because you are unique, amazing and capable of love.

I hope this helps.

6 months ago · 9 notes

Some Heartwarming Pictures from the First Day of Marriage Equality in U.K.

Couples featured here (top to bottom, left to right):

  1. Sean Adl-Tabatabai and Sinclair Treadway
  2. Kate Barber and Melanie Elvins
  3. Andrew Wale and Neil Allard
  4. Sarah Keith and Emma Powell
  5. Kyle Emerson & Richie Wood
  6. Phil Robathan and James Preston

Click for more on BuzzFeed here.

All rights of pictures are reserved to respective owners.

6 months ago · 291 notes · Source

Anonymous asked: “Hi just want to say something really random and irony that has been bothering me nowadays. I feel really bad of myself for being gay . Why? Because how people have shaped the word gay and propagandism taking over changing my mindset of how I view myself . I sometimes hate myself for being gay”

Hello anon,

You should never do that. There will be words that will be shaped into some ways by some people, there will be usages in languages that will be bothering, but this should never make you hate yourself. You define the word gay, you define who you are, not someone else, not what others say. There is no strict definition of being gay, although there are lots of stereotypes ongoing, it never means you have to be one of them to call yourself gay. Some might put meanings on it you do not like, some may use it in the way you disagree with, some may use it for a purpose you are against, but this should never make you hate yourself. 

You define who you are, you define the words you use for who you are, and a definition of someone else should not negatively alter your view on your self. 

You have the power to change the way words have been shaped, to let it be redefined in the ways it bothers you, rather than accepting it as it is and letting it bother you anon.

Best wishes.

7 months ago · 4 notes

Nate Berkus & Fiancé Jeremiah Brent for Banana Republic SS2014

Read more here.

7 months ago · 2,236 notes · Source

8 months ago · 23 notes

Anonymous asked: “After oppressing my feelings for years, I've finally realized that I am gay. I am not out to anyone because I want to make sure that when I come out I am fully ready. I'm just wondering, do you have any advice for reaching the point of truly accepting yourself? I know I'm gay but I still have these feelings of shame. I want to be proud of who I am.”

Hello anon,

First of all, I am truly sorry it took long for me to answer this, as I have been busy with some personal stuff, and I just hope you will just see this being answered.

I know exactly what you mean, as I have been there, too. I remember the times looking into the mirror and just crying for hours. I do not know if it was shame, I do not know what it was actually but all I know is that I was just not proud of who I was, but at the same time, I did not want to change that either.

The thing is, if there was not any homophobia around, if it was not treated this badly, we would have never been feeling that way, would we? Why wouldn’t I be proud of myself, just because I am gay? No way, I told myself. Yes there was so much hatred and bigotry out there, yes it might have changed some people’s opinions about me, but hey, I had to be me, I gotta be me, regardless what some might think, I thought. I should just be me, and it is my right to be me, my desire to be my true-self, and who disagrees with that can just get out of my life.

Those were what I was thinking.

Anon, it is not that easy, I know, and I can assure you it was not that easy, like just one realization time above either. I had my ups and downs on my way to embrace myself, but at the end, I realized, there was no reason to be ashamed of myself. I was not living to satisfy anyone’s assumptions about me, and I was not asking for a privilege or too much: I wanted to be happy, I wanted to be me. I did not know I could have them both, until I realized that would be the only way; I realized I can never be happy if I was not true to myself, proud of who I am.

I hope this helps, and feel free to contact again whenever you need to.

Don’t be afraid to show off your true colors.

Best wishes.

8 months ago · 2 notes