San Francisco Pride Parade, June 29, 2014.

Pictures by REUTERS / Noah Berger, notary01 on CNN iReport, Carlos Caicedo on flickr. All rights reserved to respective owners. No copyright infringement intended.

3 months ago · 86 notes

San Francisco Pride 2013, June 30, 2013. 
Pictures by DHILLPHOTOS and Sara Fisher on flickr.

1 year ago · 58 notes · Source

‘The classic lesbian love story’: Pixar ‘Monsters’ producers in lovevia SheWired:

Kori Rae and Darla Anderson first met on a gay and lesbian softball team in San Francisco in 1991, according to a touching new interview in the San Francisco Gate. The happily married couple admits that their meet-cute was a stereotypical lesbian moment, but the following two decades together have been nothing but authentic, they say. 
A decade later, Rae and Anderson formally began dating while both were serving as producers on Disney Pixar’s Monsters, Inc. Between the two of them, they’ve helped create most of Pixar’s record-breaking films, including Up, Toy Story 3, Cars, The Incredibles, and A Bug’s Life. Lately they’ve been working together on the Pixar’s latest prequel, Monsters University, which earned an impressive $82.4 million on its opening weekend. Both women also participated in Pixar’s video submission to the It Gets Better Project. 
The couple, who were married twice in California — first in 2004, and again in 2008 during the brief window when same-sex unions were legal before voters passed Proposition 8 — are currently on a press tour for Monsters U in Japan, but they caught up with the Gate's Peter Hartlaub just after news of the Supreme Court's rulings striking down Prop. 8 and the so-called Defense of Marriage Act on Wednesday. 
Anderson said she wasn’t out when she first began working for Pixar 20 years ago, but notes that she’s always felt accepted and encouraged by her coworkers, who helped the couple celebrate their first wedding in 2004.
"In ’04 there were a few couples at work" who got married, said Anderson. "We have a[ LGBT company group] group called the Pix-mos. A few people got married that year — at least two other couples. A lot of our co-employees had a big wedding cake for all of us. The grooms with the grooms, the brides with the brides, all over the cake. It was pretty fun."
Rae told the Gate she was pleasantly surprised by Pixar’s welcoming atmosphere, since she was prepared to leave the company in order to be with Anderson.
"We got together (during) the last year of Monsters Inc. in 2001,” explained Rae. “I figured I’d have to leave the show, and I was willing to leave the company at that point. We had talked about it. But they were completely great. They said ‘Of course not. You’re such a great team, a producing team. We’d love for you to keep working together.’ They were nothing but supportive, and have been the whole time.”

For the interview on SFGate:http://blog.sfgate.com/thebigevent/2013/06/28/the-classic-lesbian-love-story-pixar-monsters-producers-in-love/
For the It Gets Better video by Pixar:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4a4MR8oI_B8&feature=player_embedded

‘The classic lesbian love story’: Pixar ‘Monsters’ producers in love
via SheWired:

Kori Rae and Darla Anderson first met on a gay and lesbian softball team in San Francisco in 1991, according to a touching new interview in the San Francisco Gate. The happily married couple admits that their meet-cute was a stereotypical lesbian moment, but the following two decades together have been nothing but authentic, they say. 

A decade later, Rae and Anderson formally began dating while both were serving as producers on Disney Pixar’s Monsters, Inc. Between the two of them, they’ve helped create most of Pixar’s record-breaking films, including Up, Toy Story 3, Cars, The Incredibles, and A Bug’s Life. Lately they’ve been working together on the Pixar’s latest prequel, Monsters University, which earned an impressive $82.4 million on its opening weekend. Both women also participated in Pixar’s video submission to the It Gets Better Project.

The couple, who were married twice in California — first in 2004, and again in 2008 during the brief window when same-sex unions were legal before voters passed Proposition 8 — are currently on a press tour for Monsters U in Japan, but they caught up with the Gate's Peter Hartlaub just after news of the Supreme Court's rulings striking down Prop. 8 and the so-called Defense of Marriage Act on Wednesday. 

Anderson said she wasn’t out when she first began working for Pixar 20 years ago, but notes that she’s always felt accepted and encouraged by her coworkers, who helped the couple celebrate their first wedding in 2004.

"In ’04 there were a few couples at work" who got married, said Anderson. "We have a[ LGBT company group] group called the Pix-mos. A few people got married that year — at least two other couples. A lot of our co-employees had a big wedding cake for all of us. The grooms with the grooms, the brides with the brides, all over the cake. It was pretty fun."

Rae told the Gate she was pleasantly surprised by Pixar’s welcoming atmosphere, since she was prepared to leave the company in order to be with Anderson.

"We got together (during) the last year of Monsters Inc. in 2001,” explained Rae. “I figured I’d have to leave the show, and I was willing to leave the company at that point. We had talked about it. But they were completely great. They said ‘Of course not. You’re such a great team, a producing team. We’d love for you to keep working together.’ They were nothing but supportive, and have been the whole time.”

1 year ago · 93 notes · Source

Picture from San Francisco Pride Parade 2012 — June 24, 2012by yakotta on Flickr. 

Picture from San Francisco Pride Parade 2012 — June 24, 2012
by yakotta on Flickr. 

1 year ago · 141 notes · Source

Harvey Milk (May 22, 1930 – November 27, 1978)

Harvey Bernard Milk (May 22, 1930 – November 27, 1978) was an American politician who became the first openly gay or lesbian person to be elected to public office in California, and the first openly gay man elected to public office in the United States when he won a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Politics and gay activism were not his early interests; he was not open about his homosexuality and did not participate in civic matters until around the age of 40, after his experiences in the counterculture of the 1960s.
Given the hatred directed at gay people in general and Milk in particular—he received daily death threats—he was aware of the likelihood that he may well be assassinated. He recorded several versions of his will, “to be read in the event of my assassination.” One of his tapes contained the now-famous statement, “If a bullet should enter my brain, let that bullet destroy every closet door.” His nephew, Stuart Milk, a teenager at the time, and close with his uncle, came out, along with countless others across the nation, on the day his uncle was killed. Shortly after Milk’s death, people marching for gay rights in Washington, D.C., chanted “Harvey Milk lives!”
Dan White, Milk’s assassin, was acquitted of murder charges and given a mild sentence for manslaughter, partly as a result of what became known as the “twinkie defense.” His attorney claimed that White had eaten too much junk food on the day of the killings and thus could not be held accountable for his crimes. He was sentenced to less than eight years in prison on May 21, 1979—the day before what would have been Milk’s 49th birthday—igniting what came to be known as the White Night Riots. Enraged citizens stormed City Hall and rows of police cars were set on fire. The city suffered property damage and police officers retaliated by raiding the Castro, vandalizing gay businesses and beating people on the street.
Despite his short career in politics, Milk became an icon in San Francisco and a martyr in the gay community. In 2002, Milk was called “the most famous and most significantly open LGBT official ever elected in the United States”.Anne Kronenberg, his final campaign manager, wrote of him: “What set Harvey apart from you or me was that he was a visionary. He imagined a righteous world inside his head and then he set about to create it for real, for all of us.” Milk was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009.

Read more about Harvey Milk here: 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvey_Milk
http://milkfoundation.org/about/harvey-milk-biography/
— Note: This is the 4000th post of Coming Out Journal and I am honored to dedicate this one for Harvey Milk. —

Harvey Milk (May 22, 1930 – November 27, 1978)

Harvey Bernard Milk (May 22, 1930 – November 27, 1978) was an American politician who became the first openly gay or lesbian person to be elected to public office in California, and the first openly gay man elected to public office in the United States when he won a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Politics and gay activism were not his early interests; he was not open about his homosexuality and did not participate in civic matters until around the age of 40, after his experiences in the counterculture of the 1960s.

Given the hatred directed at gay people in general and Milk in particular—he received daily death threats—he was aware of the likelihood that he may well be assassinated. He recorded several versions of his will, “to be read in the event of my assassination.” One of his tapes contained the now-famous statement, “If a bullet should enter my brain, let that bullet destroy every closet door.” His nephew, Stuart Milk, a teenager at the time, and close with his uncle, came out, along with countless others across the nation, on the day his uncle was killed. Shortly after Milk’s death, people marching for gay rights in Washington, D.C., chanted “Harvey Milk lives!”

Dan White, Milk’s assassin, was acquitted of murder charges and given a mild sentence for manslaughter, partly as a result of what became known as the “twinkie defense.” His attorney claimed that White had eaten too much junk food on the day of the killings and thus could not be held accountable for his crimes. He was sentenced to less than eight years in prison on May 21, 1979—the day before what would have been Milk’s 49th birthday—igniting what came to be known as the White Night Riots. Enraged citizens stormed City Hall and rows of police cars were set on fire. The city suffered property damage and police officers retaliated by raiding the Castro, vandalizing gay businesses and beating people on the street.

Despite his short career in politics, Milk became an icon in San Francisco and a martyr in the gay community. In 2002, Milk was called “the most famous and most significantly open LGBT official ever elected in the United States”.Anne Kronenberg, his final campaign manager, wrote of him: “What set Harvey apart from you or me was that he was a visionary. He imagined a righteous world inside his head and then he set about to create it for real, for all of us.” Milk was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009.

Read more about Harvey Milk here: 

— Note: This is the 4000th post of Coming Out Journal and I am honored to dedicate this one for Harvey Milk. —

1 year ago · 700 notes · Source

Christian Gullette and Michael Stevens

Christian Gullette, 38, who is originally from Baltimore, MD, was married to Michael Stevens, 33, originally from Santa Cruz, Calif., this past May at The Bently Reserve, in downtown San Francisco.
The couple first met in Washington, D.C., when Christian had gone to have a drink with a friend at a bar in Adams Morgan, where he met Michael. They shared the same friends, Christian explains, “but we had somehow never managed to meet until that warm, May night.” The two went on their first date (a Ben & Jerry’s) a week later and have been together for 11 years. Because of that Christian surprised Michael with the Ben & Jerry’s Cookies & Cream ice cream they had that night after the cake cutting at their wedding.
Michael (blond hair) is a lawyer and Christian (dark hair) is a poet, translator, and Ph.D. student at the University of California, Berkeley. Now San Francisco residents, Christian proposed to Michael on 10/10/10, the day before his birthday. Christian hid the ring in a “ridiculously big gift bag to throw him off,” and there were several boxes one inside the other.

From OUT Exclusive Wedding Guide - Vows

Christian Gullette and Michael Stevens

Christian Gullette, 38, who is originally from Baltimore, MD, was married to Michael Stevens, 33, originally from Santa Cruz, Calif., this past May at The Bently Reserve, in downtown San Francisco.

The couple first met in Washington, D.C., when Christian had gone to have a drink with a friend at a bar in Adams Morgan, where he met Michael. They shared the same friends, Christian explains, “but we had somehow never managed to meet until that warm, May night.” The two went on their first date (a Ben & Jerry’s) a week later and have been together for 11 years. Because of that Christian surprised Michael with the Ben & Jerry’s Cookies & Cream ice cream they had that night after the cake cutting at their wedding.

Michael (blond hair) is a lawyer and Christian (dark hair) is a poet, translator, and Ph.D. student at the University of California, Berkeley. Now San Francisco residents, Christian proposed to Michael on 10/10/10, the day before his birthday. Christian hid the ring in a “ridiculously big gift bag to throw him off,” and there were several boxes one inside the other.

From OUT Exclusive Wedding Guide - Vows

1 year ago · 65 notes · Source

10 Historical LGBT Moments

Pictures courtesy of ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives.

01. Police Officers Holding Hands At The Los Angeles Christopher Street West Pride Parade - 1972

02. Man Holds A ‘We Are Your Children’ Sign On Gay Freedom Day At The San Francisco Pride Parade - June 25, 1978

03. Harvey Milk Speaks At The Los Angeles Christopher Street West Pride Parade - 1978

04. Lesbian Women Embrace At The Los Angeles Christopher Street West Pride Festival Gay Think Booth - June 1975

05. Lesbians Kissing At The First Woman’s Building - 1974

06. Families Marching In The Los Angeles Christopher Street West Pride Parade - 1982

07. Philadelphia Gay Wedding. This Photograph Was Part Of A Set That Was Deemed Inappropriate By A Photo Shop In Philadelphia And Never Returned To The Customer - 1957 

08. Block And J.J. Belanger Kissing In A Photo Booth. The Album Caption Reads - ‘PGE Exhibition, Hastings Park.’ - 1953 

09. Crowd Holds Hands At The Los Angeles Christopher Street West Pride Parade - 1971 

10. Protesters Gather At The Stop Anita Demonstration At Hollywood High School - June 13, 1977 

ONE Archives is the oldest continuing LGBTQ organization in the United States and the largest repository of LGBTQ materials in the world is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year.

1 year ago · 1,860 notes · Source

From the San Francisco 49ers: It Gets Better

San Francisco 49ers became the first NFL team to join the It Gets Better campaign. This is great and hopefully just a beginning.

2 years ago · 28 notes

Picture from San Francisco Pride 2012, June 24, 2012, by nasaldemons on Flickr:

This couple dutifully showed their pride by spending the whole parade with their arms round each other or holding hands. That’s dedication!

Picture from San Francisco Pride 2012, June 24, 2012, by nasaldemons on Flickr:

This couple dutifully showed their pride by spending the whole parade with their arms round each other or holding hands. That’s dedication!

2 years ago · 131 notes · Source

2 years ago · 200 notes · Source