2 years ago · 28 notes · Reblogged from ismellapples

Survey: Half of Americans Support Legal Gay Marriage

by Frank Newport | GALLUP Politics

PRINCETON, NJ — Fifty percent of Americans believe same-sex marriages should be recognized by law as valid, with the same rights as traditional marriages — down slightly from 53% last year, but marking only the second time in Gallup’s history of tracking this question that at least half of Americans have supported legal same-sex marriage. Forty-eight percent say such marriages should not be legal.

These results — based on Gallup’s annual Values and Beliefs poll, conducted May 3-6 — come at a time when Vice President Joe Biden’s remarks on “Meet the Press” Sunday have at least temporarily brought the issue of same-sex marriage back into the news spotlight. Biden said he was “absolutely comfortable” with the idea that same-sex couples and heterosexual couples are “entitled to the same exact rights, all the civil rights, all the civil liberties.” President Obama, however, has stopped short of saying that he favors legalizing same-sex marriage.

Last’s year’s Values and Beliefs survey marked the first time in Gallup’s history of tracking this issue thata majority favored legalization. Prior to last year, the highest level of support had been 46%, measured in 2007. In 1996, when Gallup first asked the question, 27% supported it, while 68% were opposed.

The issue of same-sex marriage sharply divides the American public along political and religious lines. Almost two-thirds of Democrats support legalizing it, compared with 57% of independents and 22% of Republicans.

Catholics are right at the overall average in their views on same-sex marriage. The Catholic Church officially opposes same-sex marriage and Biden himself is Catholic. Significantly less than half of Protestants approve, while those who identify with no religion overwhelmingly approve.

Implications

The trend on Americans’ attitudes on same-sex marriage has not followed an entirely consistent trajectory. While the percentage in favor increased to 46% in 2007, it slipped to 40% in the following two years. In somewhat similar fashion, last year’s increase to 53% support has edged back down slightly this year to 50% — not a statistically significant change, but not a continued increase, either.

This year’s results underscore just how divided the nation is on this issue. As a result, President Obama’s campaign strategy team obviously is continuing to grapple with how to handle it — with the vice president on the one hand essentially endorsing legalized gay marriage, while the administration on the other hand stops just short of the same pronouncement. Obama’s core constituency of Democrats strongly supports the issue, as do the majority of the important election group of independents. The president has said his view on the issue is “evolving,” so it is possible he will eventually go on record as supporting gay marriage, but for now, he officially remains opposed.

2 years ago · 56 notes · Source

Delaware Welcomes First Civil Unions
By Kasey JonesAssociated Press

More than 400 people, including a U.S. senator, witnessed the first same-sex civil union in Delaware on New Year’s Day.
Lawyers Lisa Goodman and Drewry Fennell were joined in the union by the Rev. Patricia Downing, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Wilmington, where the Sunday afternoon ceremony took place.
Goodman and Fennell have been partners for 14 years. Goodman is a lawyer who led the advocacy group Equality Delaware’s fight for the civil union law. Fennell heads the state Criminal Justice Council and formerly led the ACLU’s Delaware chapter.
U.S. Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., delivered the sermon and Lt. Gov. Matt Denns read scripture.
"We felt so lifted up by everyone who was there," Goodman said by phone as she and Fennell were riding to their home after the ceremony and reception.
Delaware Gov. Jack Markell signed the law authorizing civil unions in May. Delaware is one of about a dozen states that allow either civil unions or marriages for same-sex couples.
Neighboring Maryland is preparing for a renewed fight over a same-sex marriage proposal, with Democratic Gov. Martin O’Malley promising his full support for the measure in the coming legislative session.
In Delaware, observers of the Sunday ceremony said it went off without a hitch.
"Everything went perfect, I couldn’t be happier, everything was flawless," said Ken Boulden Jr., the New Castle County Clerk of the Peace. Boulden opened his office on Sunday so that Goodman and Fennell and seven other couples could get their licenses on the first day they were available. Boulden was a guest at the Goodman-Fennell ceremony.
Calling the event a “lovefest,” Boulden said the good weather meant even heaven was smiling down upon the couple.
"It was a great way to begin the new year," he said.
Downing said she has known Goodman and Fennell for about four years and that the couple crafted a service to reflect their relationship. “I’m full of pride and joy and extremely happy and excited that this could happen in Delaware,” Downing said.
The couple had a choir that performed hymns and Christmas carols, one in Spanish, because the church has a Spanish-speaking congregation.
Goodman said that when the congregation gave the couple a standing ovation after the union was pronounced, “I was afraid to turn around because I was afraid I might cry.”

Delaware Welcomes First Civil Unions

By Kasey Jones
Associated Press

More than 400 people, including a U.S. senator, witnessed the first same-sex civil union in Delaware on New Year’s Day.

Lawyers Lisa Goodman and Drewry Fennell were joined in the union by the Rev. Patricia Downing, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Wilmington, where the Sunday afternoon ceremony took place.

Goodman and Fennell have been partners for 14 years. Goodman is a lawyer who led the advocacy group Equality Delaware’s fight for the civil union law. Fennell heads the state Criminal Justice Council and formerly led the ACLU’s Delaware chapter.

U.S. Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., delivered the sermon and Lt. Gov. Matt Denns read scripture.

"We felt so lifted up by everyone who was there," Goodman said by phone as she and Fennell were riding to their home after the ceremony and reception.

Delaware Gov. Jack Markell signed the law authorizing civil unions in May. Delaware is one of about a dozen states that allow either civil unions or marriages for same-sex couples.

Neighboring Maryland is preparing for a renewed fight over a same-sex marriage proposal, with Democratic Gov. Martin O’Malley promising his full support for the measure in the coming legislative session.

In Delaware, observers of the Sunday ceremony said it went off without a hitch.

"Everything went perfect, I couldn’t be happier, everything was flawless," said Ken Boulden Jr., the New Castle County Clerk of the Peace. Boulden opened his office on Sunday so that Goodman and Fennell and seven other couples could get their licenses on the first day they were available. Boulden was a guest at the Goodman-Fennell ceremony.

Calling the event a “lovefest,” Boulden said the good weather meant even heaven was smiling down upon the couple.

"It was a great way to begin the new year," he said.

Downing said she has known Goodman and Fennell for about four years and that the couple crafted a service to reflect their relationship. “I’m full of pride and joy and extremely happy and excited that this could happen in Delaware,” Downing said.

The couple had a choir that performed hymns and Christmas carols, one in Spanish, because the church has a Spanish-speaking congregation.

Goodman said that when the congregation gave the couple a standing ovation after the union was pronounced, “I was afraid to turn around because I was afraid I might cry.”

2 years ago · 30 notes · Source

Bachmann pauses in Iowa tour to talk ‘myth’ of Kinsey Report
By Chris Welch

Clarion, Iowa (CNN) - Republican presidential contender Michele Bachmann continued her super-charged bus tour across Iowa Sunday, attending several more events to shake hands and sign autographs.

Her events have been largely of the meet-and-greet variety - get in and out as fast as she can. The campaign has instituted a “no questions” policy at a majority of her stops this weekend to keep things moving, and that generally applies to both the media and to Iowa voters.

But at her stop at a north central Iowa Pizza Ranch restaurant, she and her husband Marcus were met with a woman wearing a Bachmann sticker who was holding a sign that read: “Gay-friendly Iowan.”

"I was wondering if you would sign my sign?" the woman wearing the sticker, who identified herself as Kathy Schnell, asked.

"Gay-friendly Iowan?" Bachmann asked with a small laugh as she signed her name.

Schnell thanked her and followed it with a question that, in reality, was more of a comment.

"I wonder if you’re aware that 10% of the population is gay. And if you have 28 children, then 2.8 of those kids are very likely gay."

The congresswoman, within definite earshot as she hovered over Schnell, at first seemed to avoid the question, trying to say “hello” to someone new.

Schnell turned to her friend and said, “She’s not listening to me.”

Bachmann must have heard that because she then turned back.

"Well, that’s according to the Kinsey Report," the candidate replied.

Dr. Alfred Kinsey is best known for conducting interviews with thousands of individuals and publishing his findings in books on human sexual behavior during the 1940s and ’50s.

Bachmann’s husband, who runs a clinic in their district in Minnesota that has long been accused of conducting “reparative therapy” by trying to help gay individuals become straight, then chimed in.

"Your facts are wrong," he said.

"That’s not valid?" Schnell asked back.

"No it isn’t," Michele Bachmann said. Her husband added, "No, it’s not at all. It’s been a myth for many years."

The presidential hopeful then moved to the next table. Schnell pulled off her Bachmann sticker.

Schnell later told CNN she is a Democrat who is not happy with the current Democratic administration and the Democrats in Washington.

Asked if she was surprised Bachmann signed her poster, Schnell said no.

"I think she wants to be a very nice person," Schnell said. "She’s adorable. But I just don’t think she should be our president."

Schnell wasn’t the only one in the room passionate about gay rights. A handful of college students were also on hand in the restaurant at the time, but did not try to raise a question. After the event, however, the group stood outside waving rainbow flags, a common symbol of gay rights support.

Quentin Hill, an 18-year-old student at the University of Iowa, said he wanted to ask her a question as she worked the room but was told ahead of time not to.

"They weren’t taking questions today. I asked one of her staffers and I was kind of shut down as soon as I started asking," Hill said, adding that he wanted to ask her about the issue of gay teen suicides.

"I think if you want to be president of the United States, first of all you have to realize that you are representing all Americans including gay Americans and secondly you should be able to answer questions," Hill said.

"If you want my vote, I want to know what you stand for. So I think it’s unfortunate that she comes and shakes hands and signs some signs and thinks she’s going to get votes out of that."

2 years ago · 7 notes · Source

If there were a show called “America’s Got Shame”, then Rick Perry and Michele Bachmann would make it to finals.

Sorry if it was too politic, offensive, or inappropriate, but I had to write this.

2 years ago · 17 notes · Source

Marcus Bachmann Presidential Pledge: Do Away With Same-Sex MarriageBy Diane Anderson-Minshall [Advocate.com]

Marcus Bachmann, husband of presidential candidate Michele Bachmann, wants to make one thing clear: he’s got an agenda as potential First Husband (or is that First Gentleman? First Spouse?) and the LGBT world isn’t going to like it. His top priority? According to The New York Times, he’ll coordinate a nationwide campaign to do away with same-sex marriage and abortion rights."We are going to get this message across," he said. "Marriage is between one man and one woman. We are going to promote families."Bachmann, who runs a controversial Christian counseling clinic that reportedly does so-called gay conversion therapy, said he’d also support his wife’s gun rights position. The Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier reports that Bachmann reaffirmed his manhood and love of the Second Rights Amendment by firing off a few rounds from a .45 caliber Kimber pistol. "This is fun," he told reporters. "It smells good. It feels good."

Marcus Bachmann Presidential Pledge: Do Away With Same-Sex Marriage
By Diane Anderson-Minshall [Advocate.com]

Marcus Bachmann, husband of presidential candidate Michele Bachmann, wants to make one thing clear: he’s got an agenda as potential First Husband (or is that First Gentleman? First Spouse?) and the LGBT world isn’t going to like it. His top priority? According to The New York Times, he’ll coordinate a nationwide campaign to do away with same-sex marriage and abortion rights.

"We are going to get this message across," he said. "Marriage is between one man and one woman. We are going to promote families."

Bachmann, who runs a controversial Christian counseling clinic that reportedly does so-called gay conversion therapy, said he’d also support his wife’s gun rights position. The Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier reports that Bachmann reaffirmed his manhood and love of the Second Rights Amendment by firing off a few rounds from a .45 caliber Kimber pistol.

"This is fun," he told reporters. "It smells good. It feels good."

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